Annual Sowthistle
Annual Sowthistle

IDENTIFICATION TIPS This annual’s bluish/green leaves form a rosette, deeply lobed with prickly spines on the margin Yellow flowers, similar to dandelion, appear in mid- to late summer – but they form on a branched stalk vs. a hollow, solitary stem. Has a tap root, and all plants parts exude a milky sap when broken. It’s often confused with prickly lettuce, but does not have spines along the mid-vein. CONTROL TIPS For optimum control, apply a pre-emergent herbicide, such a

Carpetweed
Carpetweed

IDENTIFICATION TIPS This late-germinating, heavily branched summer annual forms circular patches several feet in diameter. Light-green leaves are smooth in whorls of three to eight at each node – widest above the middle and tapering to the base. Stems are smooth and branched, lying on the ground with tips ascending. Small white flowers cluster with slender, long stalks. CONTROL TIPS Apply a pre-emergent herbicide prior to germination (before the soil temperatures reach

Redroot Pigweed
Redroot Pigweed
Dandelion
Dandelion

IDENTIFICATION TIPS This perennial week thrives in weak, this turf Bright yellow blossoms have many petals, followed by puffball seed carriers. Long, hairless leaves have jagged teeth growing from a low rosette. Leafless, hollow stems emit a white milky sap when broken. CONTROL TIPS A post-emergent application of two-three- or four-way broad leaf herbicides are most effective in spring or fall. Thick, healthy turf is important for managing this week species.

Common Ragweed
Common Ragweed
Lambs Quarter
Lambs Quarter
Canada Thistle
Canada Thistle

IDENTIFICATION TIPS Cotyledons are club-shaped, dull green and relatively thick. Young leaves are covered in short hairs and leaf margins are wavy with spines. Mature plants feature smooth, oblong, irregularly lobed leaves. Pink or purple flowers bloom in late June through September growing in 0.75-in.-diameter clusters. Unlike bull thistle or musk thistle the stems do not have spines or prickles. CONTROL TIPS Fall typically is the best time to control Canada thi

Large Carbgrass
Large Carbgrass

IDENTIFICATION TIPS This light-green, bunch type grass features seed-head spikelets in two nine finger-like branches along the stalk. The summer annual germinates when soil temperatures reach a consistent 65 degrees F. Its tall, membranous ligule has jagged edges and no auricles. Leaves are rolled in the bud, and the collar is broad with long hairs. ​ CONTROL TIPS When soil temperatures reach 55 degrees F in the spring, apply a pre-emergent crabgrass herbicide. Cho

Common Cocklebur
Common Cocklebur

IDENTIFICATION TIP This branched summer annual often is found along roadsides in cultivated fields and in vacant lots. It’s especially prevalent in Southern states. The first pair of leaves is opposite; subsequent leaves alternate. Leaf surfaces are rough with short, stiff hairs. In mature plants, its stems are brown to purple with dark spots. It grows distinctive prickly burs in late summer and fall. The burs are covered with hooked prickles, which helps facilitate dispersal. See